Category: Technology


Be My Eyes adding GPT-4 Ai object detection

Be My Eyes logo

With everyone wound up tight about how Ai technology is affecting creative industries like logo design, photography and image editing, nobody is talking about the benefits Ai is having for the blind and low vision communities. Be My Eyes is partnering with open Ai to implement some really great objectRead More …


Sony RETISSA NEOVIEWER – An EVF for Visually Impaired Users

Adapter for visually impaired users

At this year’s CP+ Camera & Photo Imaging Show in Japan an interesting new adaptive device was introduced which will allow users with visual impairment to use a camera. (from the manufacturer) The DSC-HX99 is a small compact camera with a ZEISS® Vario-Sonnar T* lens with 24-720mm zoom, an 18.2Read More …


Samsung announces TV feature for the visually impaired

Samsung Corp. Logo

CES is always a fun time for those that follow tech. This year Samsung announces the inclusion of Relumino mode in their Neo QLED 8K and 4K TVs later this year. The technology makes the television picture clearer by increasing sharpness, contrast and outlines. From Mashable: The feature, called ReluminoRead More …


Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Wireless Desktop Keyboard and Mouse

Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Wireless Desktop Keyboard and Mouse sitting on a white background

A little over a year ago, I purchased a Microsoft Sculpt Ergonomic Wireless Desktop Keyboard and Mouse to replace my aging ergonomic keyboard, which was also from Microsoft. At the time, choices were limited and even though I didn’t need a keyboard, I ended up with the keyboard and mouseRead More …


Why is technology and software for people with visual impairment so expensive?

A laptop with a braille adapter attached to the bottom of the keyboard

Anyone who has browsed the costs for software or hardware commonly used by those who are blind or visually impaired has certainly suffered sticker shock at the prices associated with this useful tech. Why does it cost so much to buy products that can make people’s lives easier, and theRead More …


Microsoft Seeing Ai to partner with Haleon to make health products more accessible

A closeup of a person using a smartphone screen reader to read a vitamin bottle label

The seeing Ai app is getting an update which will deliver curated information about certain health products, making them more accessible. Microsoft, the producer of the Seeing Ai app will be partnering with Haleon, a manufacturer of common health products like Sensodyne, Centrum, Aquafresh, ChapStick and Emergen-C. This will beRead More …


Lancaster Museums enable Visually Impaired People to appreciate arts collection through 3D Printed Versions of Paintings

blind travels logo, text and silhouette of guide dog and handler

Making art accessible 3d printing has come a long way in a very short time. I love that museums and other art institutes are utilizing this technology to make art of all kinds accessible to the visually impaired. From the article: Lancaster district’s art collection will soon be brought to lifeRead More …


Envision glasses visual aid review

blind travels logo and envision glasses product image

We here at Blind Travels have been following the progress of the Envision glasses visual aid for a couple of years now. Recently, we reported on the availability of this new product and some of its key features. The glasses provide users with low or no vision the ability toRead More …


New glasses incorporate AI to help the visually impaired

Image featuring the blind trtavels logo, and the Envision glasses

Anyone who is blind or visually impaired can instantly list the everyday tasks that cause them frustration. Reading a menu at a restaurant, determining who is in a room when you enter, finding an open seat when boarding a bus or train, and telling the difference between various denominations ofRead More …


New device uses haptics to allow the visually impaired to sense their surroundings.

The blind travels logo. A sillhouette of a man holding the harness of a guide dog also in silhouette.

Using 3d printed goggles holding stereo infrared sensors, scientists have developed a system for the visually impaired to navigate more effectively.  Users wear arms receptors which inform the user of objects in their path, according to the developer: “Distance information from the camera is mapped onto a 2D vibration arrayRead More …


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